Keith Harding had started writing about the history of football in  Central Wales. He concentrated on Newtown  A.F.C. and the Severn Valley. Sadly his work was never completed.
I am extremely grateful to his daughter Nicky Morris for permission to include his work on this website and for the honour of agreeing to me supplementing his work with additional information.
I shall be adding to this from time to time, so please re visit the webpage.
If any club in Central  Wales wishes to add information about themselves, please contact me via the e-mail link mail@penmon.org 
BLOG; CLICK HERE TO SEE THE LATEST UPDATES ON www.penmon.org

 





with additional information by Ken Davies


Keith Harding's research seals
Wrexham F. C.'s formation date
as 1864

via   
www.penmon.org

Wrexham FC Oldest Club in Wales!
Written by Wrexham Supporters Trust on 04 July 2012.

Members of Wrexham Supporters Trust voted last week on the facts put before them as recognising that Wrexham Football Club were actually formed in 1864, and to change year on the club badge accordingly.

It means that the club is now the oldest in Wales, and the third oldest professional club in the world behind Notts County (1862) and Stoke City (1863).


Supporters Trust Chairman Peter Jones said: "The information came to light following the local newspaper of its time, the 'Wrexham Advertiser' being put on line, and thus allowing 'one word' searches, thus eliminating the needle in the haystack process of looking through the newspaper's microfilm reels at the local studies centre.


"A member had contacted us to state that he had found evidence of the club playing in 1866, through to 1869. Further investigations were made, and it was found that the club had held its first annual meeting on 26th September 1865 in the Turf. We then looked further back, and found that at the annual dinner of the Denbighshire County Cricket Club, their secretary Edward Manners purchased a football for "the great want of amusement in this town in winter time".

On Saturday 22nd October 1864, Wrexham Football Club played their first ever game against the Prince of Wales Fire Brigade on the Racecourse where we still play today. It was advertised that the game was to be fifteen-a-side, but it turned out to be a ten-a-side game 'which resulted in an easy victory for the Fire Brigade, they winning the two first goals out of three.'

In the Wrexham Advertiser dated 23rd September 1865, 'The First Annual Meeting' of Wrexham Football Club is advertised for members to attend at the Turf on Tuesday 26th September........

"What did cause us concern was the fact that we could not find any record to matches played between 1869 and 1872, but we also found no record of any football being played at that time in the newspaper.

However, further information came to light when Ken Davies of the excellent Penmon web site contacted us with a copy of the Montgomeryshire Express newspaper from the late Keith Harding's collection.

Mr. Harding was a former Chairman of Newtown, who had won the Welsh Cup in 1879, and the newspaper reported on that celebration dinner at which it was reported: "We have got a gentleman here who can date back fifteen years as Mr Evan Morris is the vice-president (FA of Wales). He is more - he is the president of the Wrexham Football Club. Evan Morris went on to state: "Your worthy Chairman has spoken of me as President of the football club at Wrexham, which has existed for 15 years.
Further to that information; J.A. H. Catton's book 'The Real Football' printed in 1900, was an amplification of a lecture given to the members of Notts County FC in November, 1890, and stated on page 200: "Wrexham is quite an ancient home of the game, for a club was established there in 1864."

This proves beyond all doubt the continuity of Wrexham Football Club from its formation in October 1864. It also means that we can look forward to celebrating our 150th Anniversary in two years time."

INTRODUCTION

The first serious attempts at laying down the rules of football went some way to improving the game as a spectacle. In 1848, at Cambridge, 14 men represented Eton, Harrow, Winchester, Rugby and various other public schools, after a seven hour session, produced the so called 'Cambridge Rules' - rules that were adapted and tightened up twice in the 1850's.


Cambridge University

Cambridge Rules circa 1856

No copy of the 1848 rules survives but the following set of University Rules circa 1856 has.

The Laws of the University Foot Ball Club
  1. This club shall be called the University Foot Ball Club.
  2. At the commencement of the play, the ball shall be kicked off from the middle of the ground: after every goal there shall be a kick-off in the same way.
  3. After a goal, the losing side shall kick off; the sides changing goals, unless a previous arrangement be made to the contrary.
  4. The ball is out when it has passed the line of the flag-posts on either side of the ground, in which case it shall be thrown in straight.
  5. The ball is behind when it has passed the goal on either side of it.
  6. When the ball is behind it shall be brought forward at the place where it left the ground, not more than ten paces, and kicked off.
  7. Goal is when the ball is kicked through the flag-posts and under the string.
  8. When a player catches the ball directly from the foot, he may kick it as he can without running with it. In no other case may the ball be touched with the hands, except to stop it.
  9. If the ball has passed a player, and has come from the direction of his own goal, he may not touch it till the other side have kicked it, unless there are more than three of the other side before him. No player is allowed to loiter between the ball and the adversaries' goal.
  10. In no case is holding a player, pushing with the hands, or tripping up allowed. Any player may prevent another from getting to the ball by any means consistent with the above rules.
  11. Every match shall be decided by a majority of goals.
(Signed)
H. Snow, J.C. Harkness; Eton.
J. Hales, E. Smith; Rugby.
G Perry, F.G. Sykes; University.
W.H. Stone, W.J. Hope-Edwardes; Harrow.
E.L. Horner, H.M. Luckock; Shrewsbury

The game was now established on a common foundation. Competition was possible and winning became important. By 1855 rules like these were basis of inter-university matches, and the legendary inter-school matches of public school fiction had come to blossom.

Many would argue that the most important date in the history of football is the 26th  October 1863. That was the day on which the Football Association came into being and the point at which the modern game of football can said to have begun. The meeting was held at the Freemasons Tavern, Queen Street, Holborn, London, and this event was highly significant. The reasons for the meeting were essentially mundane as the representatives were simply trying to establish a uniform set of rules and so avoid the long debates which always preceded any game between teams which operated under different codes.

1863 Cambridge University Rules

In October 1863, shortly before the first meeting of The Football Association, a committee drew up a new revision of the Cambridge rules. These rules were soon published in the press, and were subsequently brought to the attention of the committee of the fledgling Football Association. These rules found favour with a majority of the members of the FA and influenced the draft rules that were then under discussion by the FA. The FA committee voted to adopt parts of the Cambridge rules and led to the displeasure of representative from Blackheath. Blackheath's decision to withdraw from the FA further precipitated the subsequent development and codification of the Rugby game.

  1. The length of the ground shall not be more than 150 yds. and the breadth not more than 100 yds. The ground shall be marked out by posts and two posts shall be placed on each side-line at distances of 25 yds. from each goal line.
  2. The GOALS shall consist of two upright poles at a distance of 15 ft. from each other.
  3. The choice of goals and kick-off shall be determined by tossing and the ball shall be kicked off from the middle of the ground.
  4. In a match when half the time agreed upon has elapsed, the side shall change goals when the ball is next out of play. After such change or a goal obtained, the kick off shall be from the middle of the ground in the same direction as before. The time during which the game shall last and the numbers n each side are to be settled by the heads of the sides.
  5. When a player has kicked the ball any one of the same side who is nearer to the opponent's goal line is OUT OF PLAY and may not touch the ball himself nor in any way whatsoever prevent any other player from doing so.
  6. When the ball goes out of the ground by crossing the side lines, it is out of play and shall be kicked straight into the ground again from the point where it first stopped.
  7. When a player has kicked the ball beyond the opponents' goal line, whoever first touches the ball when it is on the ground with his hand, may have a FREE kick bringing the ball straight out from the goal line.
  8. No player may touch the ball behind his opponents' goal line who is behind it when the ball is kicked there.
  9. If the ball is touched down behind the goal line and beyond the line of the side-posts, the FREE kick shall be from the 25 yds. post
  10. When a player has a free-kick, no-one of his own side may be between him and his opponents' goal line and no one of the opposing side may stand within 10 yds. of him.
  11. A free kick may be taken in any manner the player may choose.
  12. A goal is obtained when the ball goes out of the ground by passing between the poles or in such a manner that it would have passed between them had they been of sufficient height.
  13. The ball, when in play may be stopped by any part of the body, but it may NOT be held or hit by the hands, arms or shoulders.
  14. ALL charging is fair; but holding, pushing with the hands, tripping up and shinning are forbidden.
(Signed)
Rev. R. Burn (Shrewsbury), Chairman
R.H. Blake Humfrey (Eton)
W.T. Trench (Eton)
J.T. Prior (Harrow)
H.L. Williams (Harrow)
W.R. Collyer (Rugby)
M.T. Martin (Rugby)
W.P. Crawley (Marlborough)
W.S. Wright (Westminster)

Notable absentees were any representative from Cambridge University, the major Public Schools and anyone from the major provincial centres of the game, Sheffield and Nottingham. It was essentially a local meeting of ex-public schoolboys living in London, but this meeting and a series of others held over the following weeks were to be the base for the modern game. By early December 1863, general agreement had been reached by the representatives of Clubs and the new Association's first laws clearly followed those of Cambridge, which embraced the true principles of the game.

The game too, had acquired a respectability - not yet the aristocratic backing that cricket was already enjoying, but the respectability that always follows a good spectator sport. The gentry did not yet play the game, but they came along to watch, to lay an occasional bet and even to raise a subdued cheer.

It was about this time that football received a shot in the arm that was eventually to make it the most  popular game in the world. The early 19th Century saw a tremendous upsurge in education for the privileged; it was the era of the public schools, whose teaching methods  impressed the aristocracy and the new industries alike.

The boys at these schools had little time and even fewer facilities for the more extravagant pastimes of country living but they quickly adapted the principles of the town and village games - all they needed were two teams and a ball - to the fields or the yards around their school buildings, and they played the games at every opportunity.

So suddenly, after centuries of official censure and puritan disapproval, people were actually encouraging boys to play football.

There was no stopping the game now. In every great public school, football of kind or another became part of a tradition. The rules varied drastically from school to school.

It was to be nearly 20 years before the whole century was playing it to a standard set of rules - and even as late as the 1884 F.A. Cup Final there were bitter disputes over basic interpretations. The twenty year lag before these laws became universally accepted was due  largely to the lethargy of the new Association. 

F.A.Cup. In the early years teams from Wales, Ireland and Scotland also took part in the competition with Glasgow side Queen's Park reaching the final in 1884 and 1885.
The 1884 FA Cup Final was contested by Blackburn Rovers and Queen's Park at the Kennington Oval. Rovers won 2-1, with goals from Joe Sowerbutts and Jimmy Forrest; Robert M Christie scored for Queen's Park.

The formation of the Association was bitter and often ill-tempered and at this time the 'Rugby' man walked out calling the dribbling men, cowards. But the seeds of the modern game were now starting to grow and flourish and it was only a matter of time before football was to become the most popular pursuit that Britain - and the world -  had ever known.

As the game flourished in England, its popularity meant that the organised game would flourish in Wales. All the events described influenced the development of the game in Wales, and in the early days this development, is without doubt, inextricably linked with the story of football in our area. The Severn Valley and Newtown in particular (as well as other areas of Central Wales), played an important role in the early days of Welsh Football, as did the Wrexham area and therefore its part in this story is a significant one.

Locally, the first reference of note to football being played was on Boxing Day 1870 in Llanidloes between two local teams, with the day being observed as a holiday. Without doubt, there would have been other games taking place in the area and this would not have been as isolated occurrence. Within five years, football was an important feature of life in the Severn Valley.

In the Welsh 'Soccer' scene, the earliest Clubs to emerge were exclusively in the North of Wales where the gentlemen farmers and University graduates had the leisure time to take up the sport. The Wrexham Club have the reputation of being the first organised Club to emerge in the Principality in 1873. There is however considerable evidence that the Druids, who played at Plas Madoc Park, Ruabon, were formed earlier. Yet in two articles in the local newspapers, mention is made of the formation dates of both clubs - the 'Druids' being formed some four years ago in a speech after a game in 1877 and in an after dinner speech in 1879 after 'The White Stars' Welsh Cup victory, mention was made by the President of Wrexham F.C. that the Wrexham Club had been in existence for 15 years.


Mr Evan Morris in the above address in Newtown, following Wrexham's defeat to Newtown White Stars in the 1878/79 Welsh CupFinal, states that Wrexham were formed in 1864


Druids FC 1879/80

The game mentioned as being played at Llanidloes on Boxing Day 1870, confirms the trend of the educated class promoting the game as it was organised by one Captain Woosnam (Glandwr) who may later have become General, whilst serving in India. This link with football continues with a relation of his, the great all-round sportsman, Max Woosnam, and it may well be that Phil Woosnam of modern day fame could be a distant relation - this is speculation at present.

In the earliest days of the Welsh Soccer scene and until the start of the 20th Century, many local players appeared in the Welsh International team. The original idea for the formation of a Welsh National Team came from G. A. Clay Thomas, a London Welshman, who made the proposal to the Field Magazine. In February 1876, a meeting was arranged and the Cambrian F.A., which was the Welsh body's first title, advertised for players in 'The Field'. The first game was arranged against Scotland in Glasgow on March 25th 1876.

FIRST   WELSH  INTERNATIONAL  MATCH
 
25 March 1876
at the West of Scotland Cricket Ground, Glasgow
Scotland
4-0
Wales
 
HT: 1-0
 
Attendance 17,000

Wales: David Thompson (Druids/Shropshire Wanderers), William Addams Williams Evans (Oxford University), Llewelyn Kenrick (Druids/Shropshire Wanderers), Edwin A Cross (Wrexham), William Williams (Druids), Dr Daniel Grey (Druids), William H Davies (Oswestry), George F Thomson (Druids), John Hawley Edwards (Shrewsbury), Jack Jones (Druids), Alfred Davies (Wrexham)

Llewellyn Kenrick became the leading light behind the newly formed F.A.W. which based itself in Ruabon. The Welsh team also played games against Lancashire and Cheshire representative teams.

Llewelyn Kenrick
Founder of the Football Association of Wales
Llewelyn Kenrick trained as a solicitor and became Coroner for East Denbighshire in 1906, but is best known for founding the Football Association of Wales and popularising the game throughout the country.
He was born in Ruabon, Wrexham, in 1847, the son of a local ironmaster. He attended Ruabon Grammar School, then trained as a solicitor and opened a practice in Ruabon.

A keen football player, he played for Shropshire Wanderers and was involved with the transformation of the Plasmadoc club into Druids, a team which continues to exist today.

In 1876 Kenrick saw a letter in a newspaper challenging the Welsh nation to form its own football team. In order to rise to this challenge Kenrick formed the Football Association of Wales. Its constitution was drawn up in the Wynnstay Arms Hotel in Ruabon.

In March 1876 the Welsh national side played for the first time, losing 4-0 to Scotland. Kenrick himself played for the team several times, the last time being in 1881 when he filled in for a missing player and had to play in his everyday clothes.

He died in Ruabon in 1933.  

The earliest Welsh team did not contain any representatives from the South. In these early days of the Welsh National team, Welsh football was North and Mid Wales football and this theory was to be guarded into the 20th century, in obsessive  fashion, even when the professionals of the industrial South had left the northern amateurs behind. The prejudices that emerged as the infant entered the 20th century unfortunately did not disappear and in so many aspects of administration of Welsh Football, these traditional prejudices still linger on even today. They have hampered innovation and can be seen as a factor in the rapid strides with the other code - Rugby Football has made in all areas of Wales in the past 30 years, and unless these prejudices are recognised and then put aside, the game that we love will not make the progress it should do in all areas of Wales and in our own Severn Valley.


Wrexham Welsh Cup Winners 1877/78

The first Welsh Cup competition took place in 1877/78 season with the Competition being won by Wrexham who beat Druids in the final. Druids had in fact been beaten by the 'White Stars' in an early round, but an objection was laid against them. After winning the title, Wrexham came to Newtown and suffered a surprise defeat by the Newtown Club. There was in fact no trophy in the first year - this came in the 1878/79 Season, when the Newtown White Stars' took the title away from Wrexham - 21 teams had originally entered the competition. 


Newtown White Stars

The triumph in the 1878/79 Welsh Cup Competition and subsequent other appearances by Newtown teams in the Final - another win came in 1894/95, underlines the central role played by Newtown and hence the surrounding area in the early 'soccer scene'. This tradition has lingered on through the ensuing years with Clubs in Central Wales still prominent  in the Welsh Non-League scene - their facilities being the equal of any in the rest of Wales.

The mention of the early game played at Llanidloes on Boxing Day 1870 and the meeting called by Edward Gittins in Newtown in 1873/74 to form a Club to play football confirms that interest existed in the area at the same time that the game was developing in other areas in North Wales.

By 1875, mention can be found of Clubs being in existence in Newtown - White Stars and Newtown being the most important clubs - while Llanidloes were playing as a club in the Autumn of 1875.

1876 saw the mention of Clubs in many parts of the Severn Valley - Kerry, Montgomery, Churchstoke.

1877 - Aberystwyth were playing competitive games 1878 - Welshpool mentioned as having a team. Berriew, Llandyssil, Montgomery.

These are only examples of dates when teams were seen to be playing but the extent to which the game had flourished within a matter of a few years. The
growth of teams in the south came at least ten years later in the 1880's but growth there became rapid too.

In this early period of organised 'Soccer' in Wales the triumph of Newtown White Stars was a significant feature and the fact that two teams from Newtown could reach the Semi-final stage of the Welsh Cup Competition in 1878/79, indicated the strength in depth that the game had in the area.


WELSH  CUP      

    1878 / 79

Round

Newtown White Stars

Newtown Excelciors

1
2
3
S-Final
Home 3v0 Dolgellau
Home 2v0 Gwersyllt Foresters
Bye to Semi Final
Neutral 1v3 Oswestry
Home 6v0 All Saints (Salop)
Home 1v0 Wrexham Albion
Neutral 1v1  4v2 Druids FC
Ruthin given a bye to Final

The game grew in popularity with teams enjoying various degrees of success and the formation of Leagues and Competitions soon came into being - the game became a participation one and a spectator one. Crowds flocked to see teams play as can be seen by reports of the day and should the team be successful, the players were often given great welcomes back into the community to the strains of the local band playing 'See The Conquering Hero Comes'.

The game was played in Newtown in the early 1870's and young people interested in playing the game were asked to gather together at the Sportsman Inn (later the Greyhound Inn, High Street) by one Edward Gittins - a blacksmith of Coedyffridd - later to become known throughout football circles in Wales as a great enthusiast and player of courage. The team he formed became known as the 'White Stars' - players at this time frequently played in jerseys of a different colour from those of their team mates and as a means of identification, they pinned a piece of white material cut in the shape of a star to their chests, thus the team got its name.        

The major Competition in Central Wales today is the Central Wales League, which can be traced back to the Montgomeryshire and District League, which commenced in the Autumn of the 1904/05 season. The competing teams in this first season were Newtown, U.C.W., Aberystwyth , Royal Welsh Warehouse, and Welshpool. Moves had been made in the previous 18 months, particularly by the local newspaper - The County Times, when arrangements were made to change the local train times to suit the  Coastal Clubs, but it was not until 1904 that happened. Mr John Everall, later to be a prime mover in the Montgomeryshire Cup, was also involved in this formation.

DEVELOPMENTS OF THE GAME OF ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL

 

1314

The Lord Mayor of London issued a proclamation forbidding football within the city due to the rumpus it usually caused. Infringement of this law resulted in imprisonment.

1331

King Edward III passed harsh laws to suppress football, which was regarded as a public nuisance. France introduced similar measures..

1338 to 1453

The 100 years' war between England and France saw the English the court unfavourably disposed towards football.Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V made football punishable by law because the game prevented their subjects from practising more useful military disciplines, particularly archery, which played an important and valuable role in the English army at that time.

1424

All the Scottish kings deemed it necessary to censure and prohibit football. Particularly famous amongst these was the decree proclaimed by the Parliament convened by James I in 1424: "That na man play at the Fute-ball". None of these efforts had much effect. The popularity of the game amongst the people and their obvious delight in the rough and tumble for the ball went far too deep to be uprooted.

1608

In Manchester football was banned because so many windows had been smashed.It was regarded as a public disturbance

1731 to 1841

Authorities in Derby  made continual attempts to ban football from the streets. Eventually,  they had to introduce riot laws before there was any effect.

1846

Taking part in football became compulsory in schools. Dr. Thomas Arnold, the head of Rugby school, made a standard set of rules for an organised matches. However, these were very rough enough, kicking an opponent's legs below the knees was allowed with the instruction that the opponent 'should not be held still whilst his shins were being worked on'.

1857

Sheffield, the oldest club still in existence was founded and are acknowledged by FIFA as the world's oldest still existing club.

My thanks to Chris Travers for this information KD


1862

 

Notts County, formed

1863

As mentioned in the introduction this year saw the birth of the Football Association. The 26th October is perhaps the most important date in the history of football - meeting held at the Freemasons Tavern, Great Queen Street, Holborn, London. E. C. Morley of Barnes proposed a motion 'that the Clubs represented at this meeting now form themselves into an association to be called the Football Association'. The meeting is often described as the point at which the 'modern' football era can said to have began.

Nov 10 - another meeting to consider a set of national rules - problems of the size of field and goalposts and whether to start the game by kicking the ball, throwing it up, or by rolling down the centre.

Nov 11 - newly formed F.A. met to draw up rules for football. First draft followed the 'Cambridge Rules' and 'Dribbling Schools Rules' with two exceptions re running with the ball towards the opponents goal and charging, holding and tackling.

Reputed that 1863 was the year when the word 'Soccer' came into being - a famous centre-half, Charles Werford -Brown, was asked in his Oxford rooms whether he was that day playing rugger. 'No' he said facetiously, 'I'm playing soccer', an evident play on the word 'association'.

1864

Meeting in Cambridge - first formal LAWS of the game drawn up. 14 representatives of various public schools including Eton, Harrow, Winchester and Rugby. The meeting lasted 7 hours - the so called Cambridge Rules were drawn up - this was an important step in the evolution of the modern game.

1866

31st March- London (in reality, the Football Association) played Sheffield at Battersea Park, winning easily by 2 goals and 4 touch downs to nil. This match was the first where the game's duration was agreed for one and a half hours.

Charles W. Alcock joined the F.A. Committee, born in Sunderland and educated  at Harrow, he was a man of wide national vision.

1867

Queen's Park, the oldest Scottish Club formed.

1870

 Charles W. Alcock became secretary of the Football Association, aged 28, and the next ten years were to become the most significant in the history of the game, just as Alcock is arguably the most important figure in that game. He had great influence - started the F.A. Cup and instigated the first international.

1871

20th July - Resolution put forward by Alcock to start a Cup Competition - accepted that this was the birth of the F.A. Cup. Trophy purchased for £20.

Goalkeepers first mentioned in the laws.
Jan 3 Reference to early football.
There is an early mention of a football match being played in Llanidloes on Boxing Day

   1870

1870 - the event is described as-

'the chief topic of conversation in this vicinity, at present, is the Football match which was played last Monday between Captain Woosnam's (Glandwr) team and a partly selected team from the town under the leadership of Mr B.C. Roberts.

The day was observed as a holiday throughout  the neighbourhood and hundreds flocked to the Lower Green to witness the exciting game. Play commenced at 11.45 and continued until 2.20.At 6.30 in the evening, both parties sat down to an excellent spread provided by Mr & Mrs Hamer at the Volunteer Arms.

1871


F. A. CUP
1871/72
Fifteen teams entered the inaugural FA Cup including Queen's Park of Glasgow, the only entrant from outside the Greater London area. In view of the cost of travel, they were given a bye until the semi-final with a promise that if they won, the final would be played the following day. In the event their game with Wanderers finished s scoreless and Queen's Park withdrew.

Wanderers 1v0
 Royal Engineers
 
venue Kennington Oval
date 16 March 1872

Wanderers, a club that drew its players from former public school teams, started the final as underdogs against the Royal Engineers from Chatham. After Lt Creswell broke his collarbone with ten minutes played, the army team had to continue with ten men. A single goal by MP Betts gave Wanderers the trophy in a final watched by 2,000 spectators who each paid 1/-

1872


1873

The Scottish Football Association was formed.

1874


1875

The Football Association of Wales was formed.

Feb 10 - Newtown Football Club - a scratch match was played on The Cummings on Friday last between members of the club. Two sides having been chosen by Messer's Ray and Morgan - colours were Red v Blue. Play commenced at half past three watched by a good sized crowd. Encounter went on until after five thirty. C. Morgan scored for the Reds.

Llanidloes Town F.C. formed.

Oct 5th Friday. Opening match of the new season played on The Cunnings - good play  from both teams. Charles Ray appointed captain of the club for the ensuing season.

Christmas Day - a match was played at Llanidloes on Christmas Day between ' Newtown Whitestar' club and the Llanidloes club resulting in a win for Llanidloes. The 'Whitestars' name comes from the action of putting on a white star cut out of cloth onto different coloured shirts worn by the players to distinguish them from their opponents.

1876

Jan 11. Football match played of the Bryn Ground between the Green Whitestars and the Cambrian Club. Great interest in the game.

Jan 25th. Match played on the Cunnings between Newtown Football Club and 15 Good Templers. 5-1 victory to the Town team - good support from the people of the town.

Feb 1 Report of the return fixture between Newtown and Kerry.
'On Saturday afternoon, a return match was played on the Old
Racecourse Ground, between the Newtown club and Kerry - the first match had been played two weeks before and had been drawn. Members of both clubs had been entertained to luncheon by Mr Robert Pryce, the highly esteemed landlord of the Herbert Arms, Kerry and father of the Captain of the Kerry Club.

A large crowd watched the return game - Mr Ray winning the toss for Newtown - game was well contested and after continuing for two mortal when the shades of night set in, the contestants had to be called off the field and the game declared a draw.

Feb 22nd. Wales v Scotland. Game due to be played on 25 March in Glasgow. Messers William Pryce and R.O. Evans from the Newtown Club were invited to play but neither were able to travel and withdrew.

Feb 29. Churchstoke v Newtown 0v1 result - very wet and windy day which spoilt the game. The more experienced Newtown team dominated the game.

March 7. Report of a return match between Oswestry and Newtown played on the Old Racecourse Ground. Great interest in this game as Oswestry had won the first encounter. Newtown won this keenly contested game 1v0

April 4th. Last game of the season played by the Newtown Club when they played a team selected from the players who lived in Newtown. The Club team won 4v0. Splendid dinner held after the game at the Elephant and Castle Hotel.

November 4th. Newtown v Kerry - this match was played in Kerry and after one and half hours of play, a drawn game was declared. For the home  team W. Woosnam, G. Woosnam and A. Pryce had good games. For the Newtown club, C. D. Ray the captain, R.O. Evans, E. Morgan, Templeton and M. Woosnam played exceptionally well.

November 14th. Newtown played the Newtown White Star Club on the Racecourse Ground, with the Whitestars winning by a single goal.

December 5th. Return game between the two Newtown teams - after two hours of play, a drawn match was declared

 

1877

New Years Day.. Newtown v Oswestry. Played on the Racecourse in torrents of rain. Play lasted one hour and was declared a draw. Cuthbert, Ray, Evans and Morgan did well for Newtown. W.H. Davies, Shone and Higham played well for Oswestry.

January 23rd. Newtown v Aberystwyth. Match played on the Newtown ground when the home side won 1v0 (Saturday 20th January) the goal being scored by W. Woosnam. Messers H. & J. Hughes, Jenkins and Jones were in good form for Aberystwyth, while Ray, Evans, Thomas and Morgan did well for Newtown

Newtown; Ray, R.O. Evans, Morgan, W. Woosnam, G. Thomas, Templeton, H. Edmunds, W. Davies, T. Breeze, Pilot, W. Ray; Umpire D. Morgan.

Aberystwyth; H. Hughes, J. Hughes, Thring, Smith, J.H. Jones, J. Jenkins, E.R. Close, E. R. Roberts, C.T. Davies, C. Morgan.

January 30th. Newtown White Stars v Newtown. 2v0 to the White Stars on the old Racecourse Ground. Andrew and Reynolds scored the goals.

Aberystwyth v Newtown played on March 10th at Aberystwyth. Game started at 3:15.
E. Morgan, C.D. Ray, R.O. Evans, W. Woosnam, L. Moore, W.H. Lambert, C.T. Davies, G. Thomas, T. Price, D.R. Davies, C. Morgan
.

March 13th. Newtown White Stars v Oswestry Grammar School (February 24th) at Oswestry, also return between town and White Stars - 0v1 at the Racecourse Ground.

March 20th. Match played on The Cunnings 17th March, between White Stars and Llanidloes, resulted in a 1v0 win for the home side.

April 10th. Newtown beat White Stars in the last game of the season. The Newtown Club then held their annual dinner at The Lion Hotel. Had played 13 games, 4 wins, 2 defeats and 7 draws. At the dinner, a speech was made and included comments about the growth of football:
"Football has of late years grown in such universal popularity that it may almost be termed the national winter game. Unquestionably, it is one of our most ancient of our English pastimes - it fell into disrepute owing to the rough character of the sport in the 16th and 17th  centuries. Until about 10 years ago, it was almost strictly confined to Rugby and some of the principal schools. It has of late years extended itself to all parts of the country and now it may be said to occupy the same position  in winter as cricket does in summer. Many merits recommend it strongly to our favour. To be a good football player requires a rare combination of skill and activity, courage and self control."

These  comments made as they were in 1877 at a local club dinner, confirms how rapidly the game had grown in standing and importance.

Sat October 13th. First recorded tie in the WELSH CUP played at Newtown. Newtown v Druids, 1v1 draw. Game started at 2.30 in front of a large crowd - high wind caused problems. Evans scored for Newtown in the first half. Ll. Kendrick prominent for Druids. No trophy had been bought for this competition.

DRUIDS
One of Wales' oldest club played in Cefn Mawr, near Wrexham and won the Welsh FA Cup eight times in thirteen appearances between 1879 and 1904. They were eclipsed by the rise of professional teams but play to this day.

They also competed in the
F.A. Cup

October 30th. Newtown White Stars beat Ruabon 1v0 at Ruabon - goal scored by T. Price.

November 20th. Aberystwyth v Newtown. Home team late in arriving, 3.30 start. W.S. Pryce scored the only goal of a highly contested game
.

William Woosnam, M. Woosnam, A.T. Williams, Edward Morgan, Cornish, Evan Jones, C. P. Davies, Edward Oliver, Buckley, W.S. Pryce, D. Morgan, Umpire; C.D. Ray.

December 25th Game played on December 15th. Newtown 1v1 Milford & Sudley Utd..  White Stars 2nd XI 2v0 Milford & Sudley.

Game played on December 24th. Newtown 0v0 All Saints, Shrewsbury.
H. Edmunds, W. Woosnam, Charles T. Davies, Edward Morgan, M. Jones, M. Woosnam, G. Thomas, G. T. Cornish, W.B. Ray, W.H. Cuthbert, D. Morgan

1877

It is believed that the first Caersws Football Club was founded over one hundred and twenty years ago, there being reference to Caersws Red Rose playing Newtown Blue Stars in December 1877.

A Welshpool  town selection played against Newtown's Second XI. This match ended in a 0-0 draw.

1878

Welshpool Football Club formed. formation by winning 2-1 at the rival's grounds.

Welsh Cup game - replay of game drawn - played at the Druids ground at Plas Madoc - the ground was in a terrible state and the crowd hostile. The home side gave little away and won 1-0. Thomas Pryce had a fine game in goal.

Newtown played Welshpool away and won 2v1 . Welshpool however, won 2v1 at Newtown.
Llanidloes Half Moon 2v0 Railway Club.
Half Moon Team; Robert Thomas, Thomas Trevethan, R. Owen, D. Marpole, Evan George, Owen Brown, John Brown, Samuel Lewis, Albert Breese, William Hamer, W.C. Woosnam, Thomas Jones.

Feb 12th. Newtown Whitestar v Druids. Welsh Cup.
In a highly contested game watched by many hundreds, the local team won 1v0, with a goal by D. Reese. Quote by a Druids player "….it was greatly to their credit of the 'Stars' for our club has not been defeated during the past four years in 90 matches in Wales".

Unfortunately the triumph was short lived as an objection was lodged - game played off at Oswestry with the Druids winning.

The Druids went on to reach the final where they were defeated by Wrexham 1v0.

1880

Feb 10th Kerry 1v0 Royal Welsh Warehouse.
Caersws Wanderers 1v0 Newtown Redstars on a field lent by T. E. Kinsey of Maesmawr.

March 2nd. Welshpool Wanderers 0v0 St Oswalds of Oswestry.
Welshpool team was; W. Watkins, H.D. Bennett. W. Humphreys, T. Jones, R. Morris. H. Morris, E.M.B. Jones, A.H. Jones, J. Bennett, T. Wynn, C. Davies

The Irish Football Association was formed.

1881

February 22nd. Welsh Cup semi final played at Wrexham between Newtown White Stars and Llanidloes. The game was one sided with the result never in doubt. Whitestars won 2v0.

Newtown Strollers 1v1 Tregynon.
Royal Welsh Warehouse 2v1 Newtown Redstars
.

March 8th Oswestry 0v4 Newtown Whitestars.

March 29th. Welsh Cup Final at Wrexham. Druids 2v0 Newtown Whitestars.

Druids; B. Roberts, J. Powell, A. Powell, W. Williams, E. Bowen, D. Heywood, J.W. Lloyd, C.F. Ketley, K. Cross, Jack Jones, J. Vaughan. Scorers; Vaughan, Cross.

Newtown Whitestars; H. Hibbott, T. Jones, D. Owen, A. Andrew, E.H. Morgan, W. Andrew, E. Gittins (capt), D. Williams, E. Rees, Williams, G. Woosnam.

April 19th.
Newtown Whitestars 3v1 Llanidloes on Good Friday.
Llanfair Wanderers 0v5 Tregynon (W. Lewis 2, G. Parry, H. Griffiths, R. Thomas)
Montgomery 4v0 Chirbury (C. Whittingham 2, J. Jones 2.)

Welshpool Football Club renamed Welshpool Wanderers.

1882

Major Mandarin, President of the Football Association chaired a meeting of English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Associations to standardise the Rules of Football.

Size of ball fixed, crossbar replaced tapes, off-side and throw ins standardised.

1883

March 27th Llanidloes 3v2 Rhayader. Referee Mr D. Rees hailed from Newtown.

Aberystwyth were central Wales' only representatives in the 1882/83 Welsh Cup. They were given a bye in the first round, and beat Dolgellau Idris 2-0 at home in the second round.
Despite home advantage in the third round, they lost 1-4 to the eventual Cup Finalists, Druids.
 

1884

There were no central Wales represented in the Welsh Cup.

1885

Llanfyllin F.C. was founded before1885 because they played in the Welsh Cup for the first time in 1885/86 beating Wem White Stars 8-0 in the First Round.They lost to Shrewsbury Castle Blues 3-0 in the Second Round.

Welshpool was first represented in the Welsh Cup in 1885 but the result was a crushing 0-8 victory for visitors Oswestry White Stars, who went on to reach the final. At that time Welshpool played at Foundry Field.

1886

March 23rd, Bangor v Newtown Semi Final Welsh Cup, 2nd replay.
1v1 at Chester, 0v0 at Wrexham. The second replay was played at Oswestry - 700 supporters travelled by train to support the team. Newtown won  by a single goal from H. Hibbott.
Newtown team; Townend, H. Owen, T. Lloyd, J. Andrew, R. Jones, W. Gentle, J. W. Lloyd, Captain, W. Owen, D. Andrew, J. Chapman, H. Hibbott.

April 13th. Kerry 2v2 Abermule. Very rough game.
Newtown v West Bromwich Albion on Good Friday.
The visitors won 3v2 - the game was being watched by a large crowd.
Newtown; Hibbott, Lloyd, H. Owen, Gentle, Jones, Andrew, Roberts, Lloyd, Owen, Townsend, Chapman.

Welsh Cup Final  Druids 4v0 Newtown at Wrexham.
Scorers;Vaughan 2, Bowen, J Doughty
Druids: G H Williams, A Powell, W H M Jones, W Williams, E Moulden, J Davies, W Owen, E Bowen, J Doughty, R Doughty, J Vaughan
Newtown: A Townsend, J W H Lloyd, H Owen, W Gentle, J Andrew, A Jones, J W Lloyd, W Owen, H Hibbott, J Chapman, D Andrew
Referee T Sloan (Liverpool)

The earliest Llanfyllin F.C. match report found is a 4-0 defeat against a Newtown XI played on 28th November

1887

Caersws Amateurs was founded.

Llanfyllin F.C. also reached the Quarter Final of the Welsh Cup in 1886/87 losing to Oswestry 2-0.

January 4th. On Monday last on the 24 Acre Field there was a large attendance at the game which the visitors, West Bromwich Albion won 3v0.
W.B.A. Reader, Horton, Walker, Painter, Bushel, Haynes, Barrett, Parry, Dinnis, Lavender, Pierce.

Newtown; R. Evans, Owen, A. Townsend, Jones, Worthing, W. Owen, E.W. Pryce Jones, H. Hibbott, D. Andrew, R. Davies, J. Chapman.

April 19th. On Monday last, Newtown beat a Nottingham District Club 1v0.

1888

The English Football League was formed. It is the oldest league competition in the world. The brainchild of a Scot, William McGregor, the competition provided regular fixtures for the top professional English sides from Lancashire and the West Midlands. Over time, the competition has grown from a single division of twelve clubs to its present four tier structure of Premier League, Championship, League One and League Two, with 92 clubs in membership.

March 27th. Newtown 1v0 Shrewsbury
Newtown; Hibbott, H. Owen, Lloyd, Gentle, Townsend, T. Davies, W. Owen, C. Davies, Chapman, Worthen (10 names)
Shrewsbury; Roberts, Jones, Long, Steadman, Morris, Davies, Prosser, Pearson, Ellis, Day, Carson 

April 10th. Newtown 1v0 Nottingham. A great interest in the game.
Newtown; H. Hibbott, H. Owen, T. Lloyd, Gentle, Townsend, T. Davies, W. Owen, C. Davies, Chapman, Worthen.
Nottingham; Hill, Marshall, Taylor, Herod, Machin, Pryce, Mabbott, Herod, Wightman, Selby, Shaw.

Welsh Cup Final;Chirk 5v0 Newtown at Wrexham. Game had been the subject of an initial protest. The Final was played at Owen's Field, Chester Road, Wrexham, in front of a 1,000 crowd. Chirk won the game by taking their chances.
Chirk: E Povey, T Wynne, 'Di' Jones, J Jones, Wise, P Griffiths, W Owen, J Davies, T Williams, G Owen, G Griffiths
Newtown; H. Hibbott, T. Lloyd (capt), H. Owen, R. Jones, N. Gentle, T. Davies, Chas Davies, W. Owen, D. Andrew, T. Worthen, J. Chapman

 

 FOOTBALL LEAGUE 1888/89

Final league placings of the inaugural season
in their club colours at the time.
Each team played 22 games
.


1. Preston 40 points


2. Aston Villa 29 pts


3. Wolves 28 pts



4. Blackburn  26 pts



5. Bolton  22 pts



6. W.B.A. 22 pts



7. Accrington 20 pts



8. Everton 20 pts



9. Burnley  17 pts



10. Derby  16 pts



11 Notts Co. 12 pts



12. Stoke  12 pts 

Other hopeful clubs, which included Sheffield Wednesday and Nottingham Forest, had to be turned down.

Preston also won the F.A. Cup, achieving the first League and Cup Double, going a complete season without a defeat.

 

1889

Welshpool Wanderers renamed Welshpool United.

1890

The Scottish Football League was formed. It is the second oldest national league in the world. Originally the competition was strictly amateur, (professionalism was not recognised in Scotland until 1893) and formed of eleven clubs, ten of which were based in the West of Scotland. Of the original members, only Celtic, Dumbarton, Hearts, Rangers and St Mirren survive to this day.

Welshpool United was renamed Welshpool Football Club.

Goal nets were first used in games.

 

1891

Umpires off the field were replaced by referees on it, with a whistle and a notebook. They were empowered to make decisions without waiting for appeals. They could award penalties for goal area fouls.

In the early days of football, the game was controlled by two umpires, one from each club. But the increased and keener competition made it imperative, that the men in charge be neutral, and a referee was added to the number of match officials, with the task of settling any disputes between the umpires.

The referee gained complete control in 1891, when the umpires were converted to linesmen. He moved from his place on the touchline, to the field of play, and was given  the power to make decisions without consulting his colleagues.


1892

1893

In Britain, referees were sufficiently established by 1893 to form their own Association

1894

December 22nd.Montgomery 1v0 Llandyssil, played at Caerhowell. John Evans scored the goal.
Boxing Day; Newtown 6v0 Hanley Town. Match played on The Cunnings watched by a large crowd who expected a good game. In fact the play of the visitors was crude.

Llandinam 1v1 Llanidloes
Llandinam; J. Henry Rees, A. Woolley, Peter Price, William Jones, Jack Davies, W. Griffiths, J. Woolley, T. Jones, Tom Morgan, Charlie Hamer, Ted Davies.

Referee; Ed. T. Woolley, Wrexham.

Welshpool United 3v1 Ellesmere Rangers.

31st December. Newtown 1v2 Chirk. Game on The Cunnings - Newtown played uphill in the first half.
Newtown; Goochim, Townsend, Harper, Tucker, Chapman, Worthen, Mytton, W.E. Pryce Jones, Parry, E. Davies, H.F. Mytton.
Chirk; J. Morris, Meredith, R. Morris, Williams, J. Mates, Kynaston, Roberts, Williams, Lochley, James, Owen.

1895

February 19th. Notes by 'Wanderer' - mention of Newtown North End - team made up of young men from the Royal Welsh Warehouse.

February 26th. Newtown in Shropshire League.
Newtown; St Georges, Oswestry United, Wrockwardine Wood, Hereford, Shrewsbury Town, Newport, Ironbridge, Whitchurch, Wellington.

Newtown played Everton Reserves on The Cunnings and lost 5v1. They had played badly. In the previous two years, they had only lost 2v1.

March 5th. Welsh Cup Semi-Final. Chirk v Newtown at Sutton Lane, Shrewsbury. The game started at 3.30. The Chirk team started as firm favourites, but Newtown played really well and won 4v0, to produce a shock result.

The team were welcomed home by a big crowd with the Town Band playing 'See The Conquering Hero Comes'. The team were driven through the principle streets headed by the band amid continuous cheering.

After the match, F.A.W. Selectors announced that Parry, Chapman, and A.W. Pryce Jones had been selected to play for Wales. Newtown felt that Mytton was unlucky not to have made the team.

In the other semi final, Wrexham beat Brymbo Institute 4v0 at Stansty Road Wrexham, in front of a 2,000 crowd. Wrexham had originally lost in the previous round, but won the replayed game 2v1.

Welshpool moved to the Recreation Ground.

April 9th. Newtown played Wrockwardine Wood in the Shropshire League and won 5v0.

April 23rd. Newtown 3v2 Wrexham, Welsh Cup Final played at Welshpool in front of a large crowd. Referee was Mr Brodie of Wolverhampton. Linesmen; Mr Cotton of Rhostyllen and Mr Edwards of Aberystwyth.

Newtown; Goodwin, Harper, Townsend, Tucker, Chapman, Worthen, W.E. Pryce-Jones, E. Morgan, Parry, A.W. Pryce-Jones, H.F. Mytton.

Newtown's goalkeeper was sent off in the first half near half time for retaliation against a tackle by H. Trainer. Townsend went in goal. The ten men fought valiantly and deserved to win - great celebrations of the victory.

October 15th
Wrexham 3v1 Newtown in the English F.A. Cup. Newtown was not at its strongest with a number of the Welsh Cup winning team being unable to travel.

Aberystwyth v Llanidloes.
Aberystwyth; Jack Jones, W.R. Jones, Bill Davies, Smith, Willie Jones, Miles, Michael, Garner, Morris, Owen, Tom Rees.
Llanidloes; H. Davies, D. Jones, Swancott, Fred Davies, E. Hamer, Cadman, W. Evans, J.F. Jones, R. Evans, Mills, W.J. Hughes

Also a mention of Hereford v Rhayader in the Welsh Cup and of a Aberdare v Cardiff tie, with Cardiff failing to turn up and being thrown out of the competition.

December 31st
Manchester City 2v3 Newtown. Welsh Cup holders Newtown travelled to Manchester to play a friendly, where a small crowd watched on a very cold day. The surface was hard with lots of sand having to be used.

Chapman, an ex-Wrexham player, was prominent for City as was Billy Meredith. Morris scored to give City a 1v0 lead at half time. W. Parry scored a hat trick for Newtown and Chapman netted another for City on full time 

 

1896

The following teams played in the Newtown & District League. Newtown Half Holiday, Caersws, Cambrian North End, Kerry, Royal Welsh Warehouse, and Bettws.

March 31st. Oswestry 0v5 Newtown
The Shropshire League consisted of Hereford, Newtown, Wrockwardine Wood, Wellington, St. Georges, Market Drayton, Ironbridge, Newport, Whitchurch and Oswestry.

Newtown were beaten in the semi final of the Welsh Cup by Bangor City.

Bangor went on to beat Wrexham in the Final at Llandudno.

September 15th  Newtown and Welshpool were members of the Welsh League.

September 22nd. Newtown looked forward to a  successful season having beaten Welshpool and Llanidloes and followed that up with an away victory by 7v0 against Wrockwardine Woods.

Newtown Beat Chirk in the opening game of the league 5v0, with goals from C. Parry, Miller, J. Swettenham, and A Swettenham.

Welshpool 0v0 Brymbo. T. Jones, Dan Jones, and Mytton played well.

Teams in the league were; Druids, Brymbo, Newtown, Welshpool, Oswestry, Rhostyllen, Westminster Rovers, Aberystwyth, Chirk and Rhos.

 

1897

1896/97 saw Newtown AFC in the Welsh Senior League, where they were runners-upto Druids FC Ruabon. Oswestry were third, Chirk FC fourth, Rhostyllen Victoria fifth, Aberystwyth Town seventh, Westminster Rovers 8th and finally, Welshpool United
March 2nd, Welsh Cup Semi final Newtown 1v0 Knighton. Played at Shrewsbury on a hot day before a large crowd - many had travelled from Knighton.

Newtown; A. Edwards, E. Rees, C.Parry, H. Tucker, W. Parry, E. Davies, A Swettenham, E. Morgan, J. Swettenham, A.W. Pryce-Jones, W. Nock

Knighton; Green, G. Davies. H. Mills, Munn, E. Edwards, E. Cooper, A. Owen, A. Abley, J. Cooper, G. Lindsay, R. Turner
Keenly fought game with the result always going to be a close one.
 
March 16th
Newtown 0v4 Everton,
played on the Cunnings


Everton colours

 

Preston in 1897
April 27th Newtown 0v3 Preston North End.
Match had been arranged  by W.E. Pryce-Jones in aid of the County Infirmary and Newtown Football Club.
Newtown; A. Edwards, E. Rees, C. Parry, Tucker, W. Parry, E. Davies, W.E. Pryce-Jones, E. Morgan, J. Swettenham, C. Davies. A. Swettenham.
Preston North Ened; Trainer, Holmes, Dunn, Blyth, Sanders, Vickers, Smith, Pratt, Boyd, Beeton, Brown

Wrexham beat Newtown 2v0 at Oswestry in the Welsh Cup Final.
Wrexham won this game but Newtown had much of the play and when on top they had scored, but there was controversy when the referee disallowed the goal.
 
Cambrian League consisted of Dolgelley, Ffestiniog, Portmadoc, Towyn, Barmouth, Machynlleth
 
Newtown rejoined the Shropshire League; Ironbridge, Wem, St Georges,  Wrochwardine Wood, Newtown, Walsall Reserves, Newport, and Welshpool.
 
October 30th F.A. Cup.
Aberystwyth 1v0 Glossop North End.
Aberystwyth; Rose, W.R. Jones, H. Smith, G. Green, J.H. Edwards, E. Parry, J.F. Jones,  Hammonds, O. Jones, A. Green, J.C. Rea.
 
Newtown 1v0 Everton Combination.
Newtown; R. Goodwin, E. Rees, C. Parry, H. Tucker, Moore, E. Davies, J Swettenham, E. Morgan, A. Swettenham, W. Nock, W. Parry.
 
November 16th  Aberystwyth 4v1 Swansea in the South Wales Cup.
 
November, Aberystwyth Junior League was formed.
F.A. Cup 4th Qualifying Round;
Stockport County v Aberystwyth.
3,000 watched
Aberystwyth; Roose, W.R. Jones, H. Smith, G. Green, J.H. Edwards, J.F. Jones, Hammond, C. Davies, A. Green, J.C. Rea.

Stockport County
Welshpool Junior League was formed,
 
26th December Newtown 4v0 Buckley - the game turned out to be a really rough encounter.
 

1898

The 1897/98 Welsh Cup First round saw Welshpool fall by 5-0 away to Newport, Aberystwyth saw off Llanidloes with a resounding 7-0 victory, Builth, Newtown and Knighton were awarded byes to the next round.
The third round records just Aberystwyth and Builth playing - against each other, with Aberystwyth notching up another 7-0 victory.
Aberystwyth lost their encounter 2-1 to visitors Wellington Town. Newtown, who presumably received a bye in the previous round were defeat 2-1 at Oswestry.

 

1899

Llanidloes were beaten out of sight away to Oswestry United, by a resoundin 13-0 scoreline. Other first round results included Newport beating visitors Aberystwyth 1-0, Welshpool United failing by 2-1 at Wem, Barry Docks trounced Builth 4-1, Newtown receiving a bye.
Newtown were not featured again until the fourth round, whwhen the proceeded to the semi-finals as opponenents Wellington Town withdrew.
Newtown fell at the semi-final stage, 4-0 to Druids in a match played at Oswestry.

 

1900
The first round of the 1899/1900 Welsh Cup saw Welshpool, Rhayader, Knighton, Builth, Llandrindod Wells, Newtown and Aberystwyth Town receive byes.
The next round saw Welshpool victors by 5-0 against Towyn, Rhayader saw off Knighton 2-1 and visitors Llandrindod Wells beat Builth 1-0
The third round saw victories for Newtown 6-1 home to Llandudno Swifts  and Abersytwyth Town 1-0 at Rhayader. Welshpool lost 4-2 at Carnarvon Ironopolis and Llandrindod Wells withdrew giving Bangor a walk-over
Aberystwyth sealed a place in the Welsh Cup Final when they beat Newtown by the only goal of the game.
The 16th of April 1900 saw Aberystwyth win the Welsh Cup by beating Druids 3-0  at Newtown.
Aberystwyth Town; L.R. Roose, C. Parry, G. Evans, W.R. Jones, J.H. Edwards, D.M. Evans, Whelan, J. Evans, A.W. Green, Storey, E. James .
 


1901

The Royal Welsh Warehouse beat Welshpool at home by 2-0 and Llandrindod Wells won 4-2 at Knighton in the second round of the Welsh Cup - strangely, there was no first round!
Aberystwyth Town entered at the third round stage, but lost 2-1 at home to Aberdare.  RWW Newtown drew 2-2 with Bangor but later withdrew after they protested about Bangor's pitch width. Llandrindod, also third round entries, qualified for the next round when Flint withdrew, but the lost 3-2 at home to Bangor.  


1902

Aberystwyth Town won 1-0 at Towyn and Welshpool received a bye in the first round of the 1901/02 Welsh Cup. Welshpool were then victorious by 2-0 at Broughton United. RWW Newtown scored a famous 6-1 victory against Chirk following a 1-1 draw. However, fallers at this stage were Llandrindod 7-0 at Rhyl, and Aberystwyth 2-1 to Portmadoc, following 2-2 and 1-1 draws.
Welshpool reached the semi-finals after defeating Aberaman away. They were beaten at the penultimate stage by Wellington at Oswestry, who went on to beat Wrexham 1-0 in the final.


1903

Central Wales clubs entered the Welsh Cup in 1902/03 at the second round stage. Aberystwyth were victorious after their journey to Towyn by 3-2.
Llandrindod qualified at the fourth attempt to beat Knighton by 5-2
Royal Welsh Warehouse received a bye to the third round and defeated Welshpool by 4-2 away from home.
Llandrindod fell to a 10-0 defeat to holders Wellington Town, with Aberystwyth exiting the competiton to Oswestry by 2-0 in a relay.
A smallpox epidemic in Newtown resulted in the RWW failing by 9-0 to the eventual winners, Wrexham.


1904

October 8th. Aberystwyth v Crewe

November; Montogmery and District League was now in existence. Efforts had been made over several years with the County Times making efforts to get train times changed to enable coastal clubs to participate. Great efforts made by Mr John Everall. At Welshpool Club the league was formed after several years lobbying.
It consisted of  Aberystwyth Town, the inaugural Champions, with Newtown North End as runners-up,
UCW mAberystwyth a creditable third, Welshpool fourth Royal Welsh Warehouse Newtown sixth and finally Llandinam.
 
Welshpool and District League consisted of Athletic, Berriew, Guilsfield, Montgomery, Powys Castle, County School. 

Montgomeryshire and District
League Positions

1904/05 - 1919/20

WFDA

04
05

05
06

06
07

07
08
 

08
09

09
10 

10
11

11
12 

12
13 

13
14

15
19

19
20

Aberystwyth Town
Llandinam
Newtown North End
Royal Welsh Warehouse
UCW Aberystwyth
Welshpool
Llanidloes
Montgomery
Oswestry Works AO
Towyn Rovers
Llanfyllin Town
Caersws
7th Royal Welch Fus.
Barmouth
Machynlleth
Newtown
Pant

1
6
2
5
3
4
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

3
x
1
4
2
5
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

1
x
4
6
2
3
5
7

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

1
x
5
6
2

x
3
7
8
4

x
x
x
x
x
x
x

7
x
8
3
4

x
1
6
x
2
5

x
x
x
x
x
x

4
x
x
5
7
6
1
9

x
3
8
2

x
x
x
x
x

7
x
x
6
3

x
4
x
x
x
1
x
2
5

x
x
x

5
x
x
x
4
x
1
x
x
7
x
x
2
3
6

x
x

6
x
x
x
2
x
1
x
x
7
x
x
x
3
5
4

7
x
x
x
2
x
1
x
x
6
x
x
x
x
5
1

x

T
H
E


G
R
E
A
T


W
A
R

3
x
x
x
4
x
2
x
x
6
x
x
x
x
5
1

x

 

1905

April 22nd; Welsh Amateur Cup Semi-final replay at Owestry, after extra time. 3-v1
Esclusham White Stars v Newtown
Newtown; Pennington, Foster, Stokes, J. Thomas, E. Morgan, E.Evans, J. Jones, Miller, W. Parry, Swettenham, Smout.

April 29th Aberystwyth the first Champions of Montgomery District League. Played rest of the league at Aberystwyth - the rest team had selection problems - 3-1.
Aberystwyth; Claude White, O, Green, Stephenson, E. Peake, B. Brotherton, G. Evans, R. Peake, Austin Jenkins, Ivor Evans, W. Bevan, Tudor Jones.
Rest of League; Pennington (Newtown), Stokes (Newtown) J. Jones (Welshpool), Bellis (Royal Welsh Warehouse) Manuel (Welshpool) Trevor Davies (Welshpool) A. Evans (Welshpool) Gower (University College of Wales) M. Jenkins (Aberystwyth Town) T. Evans (Royal Welsh Warehouse) Tucker (Welshpool).  Referee Mr J. Everall.

1905/06 Season - Newtown; UCW; Aberystwyth Town; Royal Welsh Warehouse; Welshpool.

Welshpool and District League; Llanfair Caereinion; Athletic; Chirbury; Montgomery; Guilsfield; Powis Castle; Leighton; Old Boys; Berriew .


1906

February 10th. Montgomery and District League.
Aberystwyth v Newtown, day was very wet and the pitch was almost unplayable.
Aberystwyth - Thomas, O. Green, Peake, M. Jenkins, Evan Jones, D.M. Evans, Cadwallader, T. Rees, R. Peake, S. Peake, T. Davies.
Newtown - Pennington, Foster, Watkin, Powell, E. Morgan, J. Thomas, Swettenham, Owen, Denny, Parry, Bell.

February 24th. Montgomery and District League.
Royal Welsh Warehouse 0v2 Newtown North End.
R.W.W. - E. Gough, E.R. Morris, C. Challoner, J.E. Jones, R. Evans, J. Bellis, T. Evans, G. Wilmot, W.H. Rigg, M. Jones, W. Owen
N.N.E, -Pennington, Foster, Watkins, Val Powell, E. Morgan, J. Thomas, E. Owen, R.A. Swettenham, W. Denny, W. Parry, R. Bell

April 1906 - Newtown North End won the Montgomery and District League,
Played 8, won 6, drawn 2, lost 0, goals for 16, against 6, points 12.
UCW Aberystwyth were runners-up with Aberystwyth Town third, RWW Newtown fourth, and Welshpool 5th
. 



1907

Montgomery and District League.
1906/07 Season . Montgomeryshire and District Leageue;
Aberystwyth Town were Champions, with UCW Aberystwyth runners-up, Welshpool were third, Newtown North End fourth, Llanidloes United fifth, R.W.W. Newtown sixth and Montgomery seventh


1908

Montgomery and District League.
1907/08 Season.
Aberystwyth Town were Champions again - the third time in four seasons, with UCW Aberystwyth runners up for the third consecutive year. Llanidloes were third, Towyn Rovers  foutrth in their first season, Newtown North End fifth, R.W.W. Newtown sixth, Montgomery seventh and Oswestry Works AO eighth

Welshpool had joined the Combination League and finished bottom. The league included Chester, Saltney, Whitchurch, Oswestry, Oswestry Quins, Tranmere, Crewe, Chirk, Bangor, Wrexham, Middleton, Nantwich, Druids, Birkenhead and Rhyl.


1909

Montgomery and District League.
1908/09 Season . 
Llanidloes were champions in their third season, with Towyn Rovers claiming the runners up slot.R.W.W. Newtown reached their highest placing at third, with UCW Aberystwyth dropping to an overall fourth after their hat-trick of runner up position in the previous years.Debutants Llanfyllin Town finished fifth, Montgomery sixth, Aberystwyth, former champions were seventh, with Newtown North End finishing bottom of the league.

This was North End's final appearance in the Montgomeryshire and District League

Combination League;
Welshpool's form  improved andthey attained fourth spot that season.
The team which beat Crewe was; Wesley, Humphreys, Wright, J. Evans, James, Mitchell, Williams, Wall, E. Evans, Arnold Owen and Vaughan.



1910

Montgomery and District League.
1909/10 Season.


1911

Montgomery and District League.
1910/11 Season.

April 1911 Llanfyllin v Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Bodfach Hall, Llanfyllin
Llanfyllin; Holland, W. Davies, Harvey Jones, J.C. Lloyd, D. Griffiths, Jehu, Waring, Frank Davies, Thomas, Burgess
R.W.F.; Edwards, Bright, Lewis, D. Phillips, W. Jones, D. Rees, T.J. Evans, J. Jones, N. Boulton, Garnett

The Welsh Amateur Cup Final between Buckley Engineers and Aberystwyth was held at Newtown.


1912

Montgomery and District League.
1911/12 Season.

Machynlleth entered the league in DEcember 1911

December saw Newtown play Ditherington on The Cunnings in the Shropshire League, with a 3v2 victory for Newtown. Woosnam scored two goals and had played for The Corinthians.
Newtown; Ll. Edwards, Hilly Jones, J. Morris, T. Lloyd, H. Edwards, D. Rees, Jehu, Griff Jones, Max Woosnam, Boulton, Arnold Owen. 
.


1913

Montgomery and District League.
1912/13 Season.
New Years Day, Newtown were at home to Llanidloes on The Cunnings, where 2,500 spectators watched the game. Mention of Max Woosnam playing and having an excellent game.
Newtown; Beadles, W. Jones, Lawton Lewis, Tom Lloyd, Harry Edwards, Dick Rees, Jehu, Griff Jones, Max Woosnam, Arnold Owen, Harry Boulton.
Llanidloes; Roberts, Bert Watkins, Sil Jones, George Evans, T. P. Hamer, John Evans, Rhys Davies, T. Hughes, W. Owen, W. Vaughan, Alfred Evnas.

January 18th, Newtown beat Whichurch 6v3 in the Welsh Amateur Cup. Max Woosnam played - he'd motored from Manchester and was late arriving.

Welsh Cup Tie - November 15th 1913
Newtown 3v2 Abersytwyth 
Newtown; G. Hibbott, R. Bennett, W. Jones, H. Edwards, Dick Rees, W. Powell, Beaumaont, W. Owen, H. Boulton, E. Garnett
Aberystwyth; Watkin, Pugh, R. Evans, D. Jones, R.V. Sayce, T. Rees, D.R. Owen, Bert Morris, J. Jones, D. Davies, D.H. Griffiths.


1914

Montgomery and District League.
1913/14 Season, Newtown Rangers,  R.W.W., Welshpool Albion, Berriew, Caersws, Chirbury, Montgomery.

Welsh Cup 4th Round tie. January 31st.
Newtown 1v1 Wrexham
Replay Wrexham 7v0 Newtown.



TO BE CONTINUED

Examples of old football kits and some text are
Copyright Historical Football Kits and reproduced by kind permission.

Welsh Cup details courtesy of
The Welsh Football Data Archive