Here we feature details of families who do not have a connection with the towns or villages where my ancestors lived  BLOG; CLICK HERE TO SEE THE LATEST UPDATES ON www.penmon.org  


Contents;

Jack Parkinson
(Glanrafon Garage, Benllech)
Jones and Chambers

(Holyhead, Rhoscolyn, Llanfaelog)


Jack Parkinson
Glanrafon Garage

Received the following enquiry from Brian Eaton. KD

I am researching  my family tree and know that one of my ancestors John (Jack) Parkinson lived on Anglesey at or near Benllech.

We know he had a garage which we believe was at Glanrafon, also he lived in a bungalow, possibly called Penrallt on a hill top over looking the bay.

His wife was called Edith and they had a son Horace. Edith died in 1955 and John in 1961 both buried at  Llanfair Mathafarn Eithaf.

I have a lot of photos of our family in the area from the 1920's and later.

The family also had a guest house in Colwyn Bay. Apparently Jack, as he was known, was well liked in the area.
Here are two photos.


John (aka Jack) Parkinson holding the baby, myself,
his wife Edith and my mother Mary.


Left to right, Nellie Miller nee Parkinson, John's sister,
John, Francis his sister, Doreen Francis's daughter,
and Lesley Boyle, Francis's husband.

Both photos taken about 1950. I do not know if they were taken at Benllech or at the guest house at Colwyn Bay that Nellie had.
 
Both Jack and Edith are buried in the parish of Llanfair Mathafarn Eithaf.
I do not know what happened to Horace
 
The Parkinsons originated from the Manchester area.
If you know anything about Jack or the history of the garage it would be appreciated.

Kind Regards, Brian Eaton
(September 2014)


If you can help Brian, he can be contacted via  mail@penmon.org


The Jones and Chambers families
featuring Holyhead, Rhoscolyn and Llanfaelog

I was delighted to hear from David Hughes. We've been able to piece together a fair bit of information about his Anglesey family. I am very grateful to David for supplying the family photos which appear here. KD
David writes;
  

It's been some time since I was in touch with you. I must say I like your website which I find very interesting. I have been  researching my family tree, but have not got very far as a whole. I have compiled a bit about my relatives in Australia, as I have a number of second cousins there.

 


William Jones
1855 - 1921
Mary Jones
(nee Chambers)
1853 - 1936
daughter of Humphrey William
and Margaret Chambers
Great grandparents of David Hughes

William Jones was born in 1855 at Rhoscolyn.

William married Mary Chambers in1880 and the couple lived in Holyhead until about 1883, when they moved to back to Rhoscolyn

Certificate of Marriage

1880 Marriage solemnized at Ebenezer Kinstown, Holyhead in the District of Anglesey in the County of Anglesey

6th May 1880
William Jones, 24 years, bachelor, occupation Butcher, of Gareglwyd, Rhoscolyn. Father; William Jones (deceased), Farmer
Mary Chambers, 26 years, of 13 Kingsland, Holyhead. Father; Humphrey Chambers, Foreman.
In the presence of Thomas Jones and Anne Williams


1891 census, Bryn, Rhoscolyn

William Jones was 35 and a farmer. Mary Jones, his wife was 37. Interestingly the census enumerator had used the Welsh 'Wraig' for wife. Daughter Maggie Jones was 9 and born in Holyhead, and sons William Thomas Jones 7, Robert Chambers Jones 4  and Humphrey Owen Jones 1, were born in Rhoscolyn.
John Owen 20, and Thomas Jones 14 were farm labourers.


This is a picture of my Great granddad (William Jones) with some family members and staff outside his grocer's and butcher's shop, Gresford House in Kingsland, Holyhead.

The shop was later sold to Thomas Brothers and was a grocers shop and post office with a bakery at the back.
It must have been going for many years as I remember Mr Thomas there in the 1960s. It is still there but it is a house now.

My Grand Father (John Huw Jones) is the babe in arms on the right, he can't be more than one year old there so that would make this photograph taken in 1895, as that was the year he was born.



1901 census, 14 Greenfield Terrace, Holyhead

William Jones was 45, and running a business on his own account as a butcher and grocer. Mary was 47. Their family living at home consisted of Margaret 19, William Thomas 17, Robert Chambers 14, Humphrey O. 11, Elizabeth A. 8, and John Huw 6. All were born in Holyhead, apart from William himself and sons Robert and Humphrey
Elizabeth Jones 18, was a domestic servant.


1911 census, 14 Greenfield Terrace, Holyhead

William Jones was 55, and recorded as a shopkeeper, his wife of 30 years, Mary was 57, and assisting in the business.
Sons William 27 and Robert 24 were labourers, Humphrey 21 was a ship joiner, Elizabeth 18 was a housekeeper and John 16, was a grocer's errand boy.


At some point after 1901, William Jones had moved to live to farm at Gareg Lwyd.

This is Bryn Bella farm Rhoscolyn, with my grandfather, John Huw Jones, sitting on the wall. He can't be more than thirteen years old there, so this picture would have been taken in about 1906-07.

My Great Grandfather William Jones is standing in the gate with other farm workers.  As William Jones had his own small farm about two miles away called Gareg-Lwyd which is still there today. I think they used to get together at times to help each other, Harvest time etc.

My great- grandfather William Jones died at the age of66in 1921.

My great-grandmother Mary Jones ( maiden name Chambers) died at the age 83 on the 25th July1936.
Her mother came from Beaumaris and when they came to Holyhead kept a pub called the Beaumaris on the top of Kingsland Hill. It is a house now and is listed in the book about Holyhead, Trains and Boats and Planes.

 


John Huw Jones
born 1895
son of William and Mary Jones
Grandfather of David Hughes

John Huw Jones was born on the 28th March, 1895, and is seen as a babe in the following picture. He was living in his father's grocers shop in 14 Greenfield Terrace, Holyhead..

This is a picture of my Great granddad (William Jones) with some family members and staff outside his grocer's and butcher's shop in Kingsland, Holyhead.

The shop was later sold to Thomas Brothers and was a grocers shop and post office with a bakery at the back.
It must have been going for many years as I remember Mr Thomas there in the 1960s. It is still there but it is a house now.

My Grand Father (John Huw Jones) is the babe in arms on the right, he can't be more than one year old there so that would make this photograph taken in 1895, as that was the year he was born.


1901 census, 14 Greenfield Terrace, Holyhead

William Jones was 45, and running a business on his own account as a butcher and grocer. Mary was 47. Their family living at home consisted of Margaret 19, William Thomas 17, Robert Chambers 14, Humphrey Owen 11, Elizabeth A. 8, and John Huw 6. All were born in Holyhead, apart from William himself and sons Robert and Humphrey
Elizabeth Jones 18, was a domestic servant.

At some point after 1901, John Huw Jones had moved with the family to Garreg Lwyd farm.

This is Bryn Bella farm Rhoscolyn, with my grandfather, John Huw Jones, sitting on the wall. He can't be more than thirteen years old there, so this picture would have been taken in about 1906-07.

My Great Grandfather William Jones is standing in the gate with other farm workers.  As William Jones had his own small farm about two miles away called Gareg-Lwyd which is still there today. I think they used to get together at times to help each other, Harvest time etc.


Association Football

John was a Welsh Anateur International and played football for Holyhead Railway Institute, Liverpool, Holyhead F.C. and Llandudno.

BRILLIANT GOALKEEPING
Jones Saves Two Penalties in
Welsh National League Game
By Cymro

One of the best performances in the Welsh National League was Conway's win at Rhos. They deserved success by more than a goal margin.

Rhos had not been defeated on their own ground in a league match for two seasons. Conway's new right wing, Glover and Meyer did well and Bob Jones, late of Penmaemawr opened out the game finely.

Another capital win was credited to Bangor, who scored the only goal at Connahs Quay. The Bangor team were well balanced throughout  and deserved their victory, the Quay forwards being poor in comparison with the visitors.

Rhyl at home beat Holyhead, accomplishing the double, having beaten the harbourmen last week.

Notwithstanding that three shots beat him J. H. Jones played a great game in goaal for Holyhead against the Rhyl forwards. He saved two penalties  within the space of three minutes.  


J.H. Jones

The druids lost to Colwyn Bay, but the result did not flatter the Eirian Park men, who ought to have been a couple of goals down at the interval. Both Colwyn Bay's goals were scored in the second half.

Llandudno repeated last week's performance at Chirk by winning on their own ground, this time by eight to one. Chirk hardly deserved this fate, as there was more than a fraction of luck about about the two Llandudno goals, which came before the Chirk defence crumbled. It will be interesting to see how the Llandudno team fare against the more formidable teams.

Wrexham Reserves, at The Racecourse eeeevened their account with Flint.

Mold and Bukley played a thrilling draw, each side scoring once in the second half.

Oak Alyn beat Denbigh with something to spare..

Results
Welsh National League
Rhos 1 Conway 2
Llandudno 8 Chirk 1
Wrexham 3 Flint 0
Connah's Quay 0 Bangor 1
Rhyl 3 Holyhead 0
Druids 0 Colwyn Bay 2
Mold 1 Buckley 0
Oak Alyn 3 Denbigh 2

Holyhead Railway Institute F.C.
1920/21
North Wales Coast League Division One
CHAMPIONS
Division One Championship Trophy
and the
Amateur Cup

 

Back Row L-R; Richard Jones, John Huw Jones, Roland Williams
Middle Row; Tom Ellis (Chairman of the committee),
H.R. Williams (league secretary), H.J. Lewis, H. Johnson,
W.T. Jones, J. Abbitt (captain), Furber, Capt. W.J. Nash O.B.E. (President), Percy Weeks (Hon. Secretary)

Front Row; Huw Jones, R.T. Owen, W.J. Ellis, D.T. Griffith


North Wales Coast

1920 / 21

League Division One

Pl  W  D  L  F   A  Pts

Holyhead Railway Institute
Holywell United  
Denbigh United  
Bangor Athletic
Blaenau Festiniog Comrades
Llandudno FC
Colwyn Bay FC
Conwy FC
Caernarfon Athletic  
Llanrwst Town  
Portmadoc 
Ogwen Valley FC 

22 17  2   3 70 22 36 
22 15  3   4 92 37 33 
22 12  4   6 57 35 28 
22 11  4   7 64 60 26
22 11  3   8 58 40 25
22 10  4   8 50 57 24 
22 10  3   9 60 48 23
22 10  2 10 44 57 22 
22  7  2 13 44 65 16 
22  4  5 13 38 66 13 
22  4  3 15 40 76 11
22  1  4 17 23 77  6

League Table courtesy of theWelsh Football Data Archive


North Wales Coast League
1893 - 1935
(click here)


This photo is of my grand-father and his brothers they all played for Holyhead at some time.
They are from left to right, Robert Chambers Jones, John Huw Jones (grandfather) and Humphrey Owen Jones with William Thomas Jones seated
.


My grandfather, John Huw Jones had one amateur international cap for playing against England at Llandudno in 1924.

JOHN HUW JONES
WELSH AMATEUR  INTERNATIONAL




Welsh Amateur Junior
International Caps

Wales v Scotland
1922 at Edinburgh
1923 at Bangor Wales 4v1 Scotland
1924 at Dundee
1927 at Bangor

1923 TEAM v SCOTS WORE CAPS

The North Wales Coast F.A. at Rhyl last week were asked if the custom of presenting caps to players could be revived for this season's Coronation inter-association match against the Scottish Juniors at Easter Road, Edinburgh on March 7.

Pictured is the North Wales Coast F.A. team which met the Scots at Bangor in 1923.

Back (centre);  Messers J. Trevor Jones (Bangor), Edward Bithell (Colwyn Bay), and T.O. Morgan (Conway).
Standing (from left); R. T. Hughes, Denbigh (linesman(, R.T. Pattison (trainer - now a Bangor director) F. Blew (Llandudno) H. Smith (Rhyl) J.H. Jones (Holyhead), Enoch Jones (Llandudno), Bob Evans ( Denbigh), Lt. Col. J. Llewelyn Williams  , Holywell (hon secretary) William Roberts Llandudno (now NWCFA hon treasurer)
Seated (from left); H. R. Williams Bangor (referee - now NWCFA secretary), J.E. Neal (Colwyn Bay), J. Hughes (Rhyl), Caradog Evans (University College and Bangor City) Howie Jones (Colwyn Bay)
Front; Norman Pritchard, captain (Bangor City) and W.S. Warburton (Rhyl).

The North Wales Coast side beat the Scots 4v1 - the first time Wales had beaten them in the series which commenced in the 1911/12 season. This was their fourth meeting.


THE WELSH TEAM
WHICH PLAYED AT DUNDEE
IN 1924


John Huw Jones is the 4th from the right, middle row

Wales 3v1 Ireland
20th February 1926


John Huw Jones is 5th from the left, back row


Welsh Amateur International Cap

WALES
1 v 2
ENGLAND
at Llandudno
22nd March 1924

England

1 J.F. Mitchell(Manchester City)
2 Sergeant Twine (Army)
3 A.G. Bower (Corinthians)
4 C.T. Ashton (C) (Corinthians)
5 G.H. Armitage (Wimbledon)
6 F.H. Ewer (Casuals)
7 R. Goldie
(Northampton Nomads)10 H.E. Miller (At Albans)
11 K.E. Hegan (Army)
8 E. Kail (Dulwich Hamlet)
9 F.N.S. Creek (Corinthians)

Wales

22 J.H. Jones (Holyhead)
21 Frank Blew (Wrexham)
20 J. Lloyd (Llanidloes)
19 JRB Mousedale
(Corinthians)
18 E. Jenkins (C)(Cardiff City)
17 E Thomas (Cardiff Cameroons)
16 W
Grace(Wycombe Wand'rs)
15 J. Nicholls (Newport County)
14 I. Davies (Liverpool Marine)
13 D. Hulse (Chirk)
12 S. Hill (Blackwells, Plymouth)

England Win Amateur International

The thirteenth amateur international match between Wales and England which took place at Llandudno, was won by England after a very stern struggle, the Welsh team being unfortunate, for on the day's play they did not deserve to lose.

They enjoyed practically all the attack in the first half, when they should have put the issue beyond doubt, but, try as they would, the Welsh forwards could not round off their clever field work with goals.

During this period they were so much the superior of the English eleven that Jones, the home goalkeeper, waited twenty minutes before he was called upon. When brought into action he was found safe and sound; in fact, he made the best save of the match when Creek tried to place a shot out of the Holyhead man's reach.

England, on paper, had the stronger side, but it was never allowed to get into working order on the field owing to the swift tackling methods of the Welsh half-back line, who dominated play Thy were much quicker on the ball, made sensible swinging passes out to the wing and they cut into their combination with such accuracy that the latter was impotent for half of the game.

Lieutenant Hegan was brought down to a standard that made one wonder why he was selected to represent his country when he was held in a grip of iron, so effectively, that it was not until late on in the second half that his presence was felt. He could not hold the 'Welsh terrier' off.

When he got his cahance, however, which was only once, it was sufficient to give England the honours.

Creek, the Corinthian centre forward was far behind Jenkins, The Cardiff amateur, who was the man of the match. Not only did he hold Creek, but his propelling power behind his forwards was very effective.


Welsh Goalkeeper of Promise

After Stanley Earle comes J.H. Jones, of Holyhead, who three times played for Wales in amateur international games.

Jones has forsaken his amateur status to sign professional forms for Liverpool, who, as I hinted recently, badly needed new blood.

I am told by a sound critic who saw him keep goal for Wales against England that Jones is a goalkeeper one can label promising.


John signs for First Division team, Liverpool for the 1923 / 24 season.


HOLYHEAD GOALKEEPER
FOR LIVERPOOL
(October 1924)

Our Holyhead reporter, telephoning last night, states that he is given to understand that J. H. Jones, the clever Holyhead goalie, was interviewed this week by two gentlemen on behalf of Liverpool Football Club, and that as the result he has signed an amateur form for them.

"J.H." as he is popularly called along the Coast, is undoubtedly recognised as one of the most brilliant goalkeepers in the Welsh League. He is also to guard the breach in the North Wales v Scotland Senior International match at Edinburgh tomorrow (Saturday).

This is the third successive season for him to represent North Wales in this match, and he also played for Wales in the Amateur International  at Llandudno.

It is understood that he will be watched at Edinburgh by members of the Liverpool Club and that he will figure in a trial match with that club next August.



LIVERPOOL F. C.
1924/25

He played 4 times for Liverpool, as cover for Liverpool's regular goalkeeper, Elisha Smith, during the 1924/25 season.

Liverpool Reserves
v
Blackpool Reserves
224th September 1924



Liverpool
3v1
Preston North End
8th November 1924

Points of the Play

It was obvious from the outset that Preston had little to offer in the way of attractive football.

In one of Liverpool's early attacks, McCall narrowly missed scoring against his own side as the ball went just over the bar as he cleared from Forshaw.

Then Jones had his first experience of pressure and he saved well from Marquis.

This was followed by good work from the Liverpool forwards, and Rawlings scored his sixth goal of the season after McCall had intercepted a centre by Shone.

Rawlings had moved to the inside position and he sent in a hard drive which completely beat Branston. Wadsworth was very effective in his forward moves and he caused Branston some trouble to keep out a capital effort.

After McCall had given Preston forwards a lead in attack, Forshaw scored a second goal for Liverpool with one of the greatest efforts of the match. Chambers got away and Yates hesitated to challenge him at the right moment, with the result that he crossed the ball so accurately that Forshaw had simply to nod it into the net.

With two goals lead Liverpool were inclined to take things for granted but there was certainly more shooting, especially by Chambers, and it was in this period that Branston revealed his cleverness.

Shots by Rawlings, Hopkin and McNab were splendidly cleared and at the eightieth minute Harrison scored for Preston, the ball turning into the net off McKinlay.

Liverpool replied with more vigour, and following another fine save by Branston from Rawlings, Forshaw scrambled the ball into the net from a well placed corner kick.

Liverpool;
Jones, Lucas, Mackinlay, McNab, Wadsworth, Bromilow, Rawlings, Forshaw, Chambers, Shone, Hopkin

Preston North End;
Branston, Hamilton, Yates; Mercer, McCall, Crawford; Aitken, Williamson, Marquis, Paterson, Harrison


JONES DEBUT

It is Liverpool tomorrow. More mid-week troubles and more mid-week pleasures. With the going as it is just now, Liverpool F.C. are moving at great pace, and are making other sides look like commoners.

Well in their recent efforts; but they are still a championship side, and they believe that they can regain their lost place and settle to a second season of honours.

Huddersfield were worthy champions last season, and this season they started in such a manner that everybody thought it was to be a walk-over. Then came a succession of drawn games, after which the cruellest blow of all - Ted Taylor's injury, which split the side.

One could hardly imagine that a team should lose confidence through the absence of a goalkeeper; yet we have seen here and elsewhere how valued a first-class goalkeeper can be. Both sides will be without  their regular goalkeeper - Elisha Scott will not play, and we shall therefore see Boot and the Welshman, Jones.

Goalkeeping has had a special interest to us in Liverpool this season, and the new youngsters have so far gone through their work with much credit. Undoubtedly, Huddersfield will be specially strenuous and stern tomorrow aat 2.45 to bring back their lost hopes; but if the home forwards continue their swinging ways, there should be no doubt about the verdict.

It is a fact that many have escaped some eyes, that Liverpool are equal to the top of the League if one counts matches in excess of those above as won !!!

This is the side we all thought - oh, yes you did; and so did I - was altogether  too old  and too poor to carry Liverpool's work this season. They played like it early on, and only their superlative endeavours of the last two months have brought a fading side into a bright light. I congratulate all the men who have helped to make the side resemble the championship days.

Liverpool
1v3
Huddersfield Town
12th November 1924

WEAK ANFIELD
HALF-BACKS
by S.H.H.

Huddersfield Town beat Liverpool by the odd goal in five at Anfield yesterday, moreover, deserved their win. They were a more convincing side than the Reds, who contributed to their own failure by weak half-back play on the part of MacNabb and Bromilow. This was Liverpool's second home defeat - the first being in the opening game.

The Reds' halves were never sure in their tackling, while Bronilow was responsible for the first goal being scored against his side.

He chose to work his way across the field instead of s first time clearance, and when dispossessed  Lucas and McKinlay were so wide apart that Smith, the Town winger could not be stopped.


A BONNY GOAL

Liverpool had a chance of making amends when, following a drive by Rawlings, Forshaw got the ball in the net after the keeper had stopped the winger's shot, but within a minute Cook, with a bonny first time effort, had dashed their hopes.

After this Liverpool played without heart.


The forwards, who had opened promisingly, lost their command of the ball ubder the relentless tackling of Watson, Wilson (T.) and Spence, and fell to individual rather than collective movements. A bouncing ball added to their discomfiture as when McKinlay tried to  ward off Huddersfield centre, Jones  did not anticipate the move, and, failing to leave his goal in time, had his charge captured.

The second half was a strenuous affair, in which Liverpool set about redeeming themselves, but although MacNabb made up some leeway  when he turned to account a free-kick taken by McKinley outside the penalty area, luck did not again come the way of the Anfielders.


Jones puches clear

The champions have lost three games since Taylor was injured, and to some extent it has been put down to the loss of theeir international goalkeeper. Ted Taylor was looking on yesterday, and I think he would be the first to admit, if questioned, that he could no doubt have done better than Boot did The 'keeper safely dealt with shots from Rawlings, Forshaw and Chambers and although he enjoyed some luck, such as when Chambers in the last minute put a cross that came back off the face of the bar, he did not make one slip.

BOOT AND JONES


Boot had certainly more to do than Jones, who finished up stronger than he had shaped in the first half. Yet the Liverpool man, apart the incident just referred to and again when he had the ball kicked out of his hands by Wilson through coming on half-heartedly to the penalty line to a long drive, kept a clever goal.


Wilson nets the third goal

Liverpool never really settled down after the second goal. The forwards moved didjointedly, and, receiving no support from their halves, had to forage for the ball themsleves, the result being their movrements were spasmodic. Rawlings was the only one that had initiative, but even he had an off day as far as shooting.

In the halves, Wadsworth was the only one to hold his own. MacNabb and Bromilow being good in parts.

Liverpool;
Jones; Lucas, Mackinlay; McNab, Wadsworth, Bromilow; Rawlings, Shone, Forshaw, Chambers, Hopkin

Huddersfield;
Boot; Wadsworth Goodall; N. Smith, T. Wilson, Steele; W.H. Smith, Stephenson Cook Williams Wilson


Burnley
2v1
Liverpool
19th November 1924

Liverpool;
Jones; Lucas, Mackinlay; McNab, Cockburn, Bromilow; Rawlings, Forshaw, Chambers, Shone, Hopkin

Liverpool
1v0
Tottenham Hotspur
18th April 1925

Liverpool;
Jones; Lucas, Longworth; Cockburn, Pratt, Mackinlay; Rawlings, Forshaw, Baron, Shone, Hopkin

Tottenham Hotspur;
Hinton; Clay, Grimsdell; Smith Skitt Skinner; Thompson Seed Lane Hargreaves Dimmock 

1924 / 25 League Table

Liverpool 2v5 South Africa
Anfield
1st October 1924

South African and Liverpool
Football Clubs
Visit of South Africa to England 1924

Liverpool; Jones, Longworth, Parry, Findlay, Cockburn, Pratt, Rawlings, Brown, Shears, Kilburn,
South Africa; A.J. Riley (Transvaal), C.R. Thompson, (Transvaal), G. Burton (Natal), G. Parry (Western Province), A. Shearn (Natal), B. Tochy (Natal) Schwican (Traansvaal), G Hodgson (Transvaal), D. J. Murray (Western Province). N.S. Walker (Transvaal) E.S.G. Stuart (Transvaal) 

FOOTBALL

SOUTH AFRICANS WIN
AT ANFIELD

A LESSON FOR ENGLISH
LEAGUE PLAYERS

By "Bee"

At Anfield yesterday, 15,000 spectators saw the South African footballers beat Liverpool by 5 goals to 2, after one of the most enjoyable games ever witnessed at the ground.

That the South Africans were worth their victory is only partly stating the case. They taught the home football public a lot of things they did not know. Yet England sent out missionaries to show the South Africans the proper manner of playing the game.

In South Africa, where the ball bounces high and the grounds are hard, the players have by force of circumstances, been taught that they must make progress by simple methods of passing and by upward pass. It is so simple and effective that the miracle is the English footballers do not realise how easy it is.

Perhaps English crowds are the barrier; they so like to see a ball worked and so see a player become tricky. It cannot be said that the South Africans were tricky; but the idea at the back of their heads was simply "progress", and they made much by their principle.
  

Secret of Success


Allied to their passing movements was the shot that mattered. Without the shot they might just as well not have been particular in making upward movements. In their case the shot was just as important as the pass.

They shot instantly, in striking contrast to English players.

The latter does not shoot until he sees an opening, works the ball to right or left, then applies a tap here or a tap there.

The South Africans did everything very thoroughly, even to the charging in the back, which was according to their football law. They did not wait for a half-back to toddle up to the touch line to take a throw in. They used the back-heel touch as though they had lived with Meredith for years.

But they did not overdo these things; they simply used them as necessary parts in the movement up they field. There were more up the middle passes from the tourists than one sees in a season of First Division football. That is one of the reasons why the visitors are doing so well. 

The stamina of the side is another remarkable feature. They were always on the go, and after Liverpool had treated them as if they were small fry, they retaliated by forcing Liverpool to work very hard.

Liverpool responded, and through the ex-Preston centre, Shears, they got level at 2 goals all. Then the South Africans rallied and made merry, and Liverpool could not carry on the pace as they had run themselves out.

Cockburn was certaainly injured, but McDevitt came out in his stead and therefore there was no excuse on this score. The most remarkable feature of the touring side was their age. The goalkeeper, a tall, keen fellow who has reach, anticipation and a safe pair of hands, is only twenty but looks more like thirty-five. The inside right, who took my eyye from the first moment, is only nineteen, but plays like a seasoned professional. 
  

How the Goals Came


It was joyous football; a goal-getting game that showed us that South African football has improved more quickly than our own.

Murray opened the score and Shears drew level. Stuart, on the outside left berth, has a shot something like that of McKinlay, and he swerved the ball a yard before it entered the net. Shears scored to make things level, but Walker increased the score abd Suart and Murray added further goals to make the final 5-2 - not a bit more than the winners deserved.

On the Liverpool side, Jones made some good saves. Pratt was the best half-back, and Rawlings and Brown made a very accommodating right-wing pair. Shears is particularly good with his head.

Result; South Africans 5 goals, Liverpool 2 goals.
Teams;

Liverpool; Jones; Longworth, Parry; Findlay. Cockburn, Pratt; Rawlings, Brown, Shears, Keetley, Lawson.
South Africa; Riley; Thompson, Brunton; Parry, Shearn, Tuchy; Schwican, Hodgson, Murray, Walker, Stuart


South African tour
of Britain 1924
(click here for comprehensive report)

Date

Opponents

WDL

FvA

August 30th
September 6th
September 10th
September 13th
September 17th
September 24th
September 27th
September 29th
October 1st
October 4th
October 11th
October 15th
October 18th
October 22nd
October 25th
October 31st
November 2nd
November 5th
November 8th
November 13th
November 15th 
November 22nd
November 24th
November 26th
November 29th
December 3rd

Dublin Bohemians
Wimbledon
Brentford
Wycombe Wanderers
Chelsea
Northern Ireland
North-West Ireland
Northampton Town
Liverpool
Wales
England
Aston Villa
Palatine League
Queen's Park
Dulwich Hamlet
Zwaluwen
Netherlands
Corinthians
The Army
Isthmian League
Corinthians
Colwyn Bay & District
Manchester City
England
Norfolk County
Everton

W
W
L
W
W
W
W
W
W
L
L
W
W
L
W
W
L
W
L
W
L
W
L
L
L
W

4v2
6v0
1v3
5v2
4v2
2v1
9v1
3v1
5v2
0v1
2v3
3v1
8v1
2v3
4v0
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North Wales Goalkeeper

J.H. Jones, the Welsh amateur international goalkeeper who was with Liverpool last season, has returned to North Wales football and signed for Holyhead.

Jones is a first-class goalkeeper, but like others he has found Elisha Scott one of the most consistent custodians in the game, and the reserve goalkeepers at Anfield get few opportunities of League outings. But then, Scott has for years been the best goalkeeper in the game. 

Bangor City 3 Holyhead  - Welsh Senior Cup-tie


Copyright Historical Football Kits and reproduced by kind permission.
Click here to visit their excellent site

 

THE GREAT WAR


During the first war my grandfather, John Huw Jones, was stationed in a place called Longhope near Scapa Flow in the Orkneys on board a R.F.A. ship called H.M.S. Victorious, an old battle ship converted into a depot and supply ship for dockyard workers.
He must have been there when the Germans scuttled their fleet on the 21st June 1919. 

Scapa Flow Scuttling of
the German High Seas Fleet
(click here
)

Contemporary reports from the Daily Mail
about the scuttling
(click here)


R.F.A. HMS Victorious. Longhope, Scapa Flow 


My grandfather must have driven buses and coaches between the wars by the look of these vehicles.
 

THE SECOND WORLD WAR

My grand-father J.H.Jones is pictured second from the left, top row.
He served in the Intelligence Corps during World War Two.
The photo shows them were they worked on Holyhead station in 1941, by 1944 he was a sergeant and I have a memo from the time with his name and rank on it.


After the war he went back to driving buses and coaches for Crosville he did that until he retired due to ill health. He passed away in 1962.
I remember him very well as I was ten years old at the time.


THE JONESES MEET
AFTER 28 YEARS

When a passenger boarded one of the Crosville 'buses at Holyhead a days ago, the driver was not mistaken when he thought that they had met before. Thereby hangs a tale.

Twenty-eight years ago - in 1917, the third year of the Great War of 1914-18 to be exact - the 'bus driver was serving in the Royal Navy and was one of three shipmates who volunteered to man a boat to go to the rescue of a sole occupant of a shipwrecked vessel somewhere in the North Sea.

The attempt was not without its risk, but the success crowned the efforts of "the three men in a boat." The shipwrecked mariner was rescued.

The reader will doubtless have guessed that the passenger mentioned earlier was none other than the sailor whom the bus driver had saved. It remains for us to disclose the identity of the two men. 

The "bus driver" is Mr J. Huw Jones, one of the well known footballer brothers (formerly of Gresford House, Holyhead), who distinguished themselves during the heyday of Soccer.

The seafarer too is a Jones, Mr John Jones of Boson Street. It is of interest to note that this was the first time for these two Jonses to meet since the dramatic sea rescue nearly thirty years ago.


 


Humphrey Owen Jones
born 1890
son of William and Mary Jones
Brother of John Huw Jones
Grand Uncle of David Hughes

Humphrey was born in 1890 and lived with his family at Bryn, Rhoscolyn in 1891.

1891 census, Bryn, Rhoscolyn

William Jones was 35 and a farmer. Mary Jones, his wife was 37. Interestingly the census enumertaor had used the Welsh 'Wraig' for wife. Daughter Maggie Jones was 9 and born in Holyhead, and sons William Thomas Jones 7, Robert Chambers Jones 4  and Humphrey Owen Jones 1, were born in Rhoscolyn.
John Owen 20, and Thomas Jones 14 were farm labourers.


This is a picture of my Great granddad (William Jones) with some family members and staff outside his grocer's and butcher's shop in Kingsland, Holyhead.

The shop was later sold to Thomas Brothers and was a grocers shop and post office with a bakery at the back.
It must have been going for many years as I remember Mr Thomas there in the 1960s. It is still there but it is a house now.

My Grand Father (John Huw Jones) is the babe in arms on the right, he can't be more than one year old there so that would make this photograph taken in 1895, as that was the year he was born.



1901 census, 14 Greenfield Terrace, Holyhead

William Jones was 45, and running a business on his own account as a butcher and grocer. Mary was 47. Their family living at home consisted of Margaret 19, William Thomas 17, Robert Chambers 14, Humphrey O. 11, Elizabeth A. 8, and John Huw 6. All were born in Holyhead, apart from William himself and sons Robert and Humphrey
Elizabeth Jones 18, was a domestic servant.


1911 census, 14 Greenfield Terrace, Holyhead

William Jones was 55, and recorded as a shopkeeper, his wife of 30 years, Mary was 57, and assisting in the business.
Sons William 27 and Robert 24 were labourers, Humphrey 21 was a ship joiner, Elizabeth 18 was a housekeeper and John 16, was a grocer's errand boy.


At some point after 1901, William Jones had moved to live to farm at Gareg Lwyd.

This is Bryn Bella farm Rhoscolyn, with my grandfather, John Huw Jones, sitting on the wall. He can't be more than thirteen years old there, so this picture would have been taken in about 1906-07.

My Great Grandfather William Jones is standing in the gate with other farm workers.  As William Jones had his own small farm about two miles away called Gareg-Lwyd which is still there today. I think they used to get together at times to help each other, Harvest time etc.


This photo is of my grand-father and his brothers they all played for Holyhead at some time.
They are from left to right, Robert Chambers Jones, John Huw Jones (grandfather) and Humphrey Owen Joneswith William Thomas Jones seated
.




My Granduncle Humphrey Owen Jones emigrated in 1920 to Australia and was a joiner by trade. He and his wife Anne were involved with the chapel (Calvinist Methodist) and carried on with it over there becoming a fully ordained minister for the last three years of his life.

 


I had some church/chapel records sent to me from the church archivist who I was amazed to find out knew and played football with my Granduncle.
Another second cousin told me he is ninety five years of age. I have pictures of both chapels he worked in and  they still have services and sing hymns in Welsh from time to time.

He had a granddaughter Glenys Beasley (maiden name) who was keen on athletics.
These Camberwell High School girls made a clean sweep of the open 100 yards event in the Victorian schoolgirls' athletic championships at Royal Park on Saturday - they were first, second and third.
The winner, in 11.4 seconds, was Glenys Beasley (centre), Lois Barton (right) was second and, Joy Morton (left) third.

Glenys was the 100 yards (10.5 seconds), 220 yards (23.7 seconds)Australian Ladies Champion in 1962.

She represented Australia at the 1962  Commonwealth and Empire Games in Perth and took part in the one hundred yards making the semi final and going on to win the gold medal in the 4x110 yards relay.



I have a number of newspaper clippings and photos of her Career before and after the games but nothing about the event itself or the team with their medals.
 

 


The family of Mary Jones
(nee Chambers)
1853 - 1936
daughter of Humphrey William Chambers
and Margaret Chambers
who married
William Jones
1855 - 1921
son of Richard and Anne Jones
Great grandparents of David Hughes

We'll start with Mary's great great grandparents, David and Elizabeth Chambers.


David Chambers
1739  -
and
Elzabeth Chambers
(nee Morris)
1859 -
parents of  William Chambers

Great great great great great grandparents of David Hughes

They had one known child, William Chambers, born 1759.


William Chambers
1759  -
son of David Chambers  
and Elizabeth Morris
Alice Chambers
(nee Williams)
1759 -
parents of  Robert Chambers

Great great great great grandparents
of David Hughes


Their children were; Thomas Chambers born 1784, John b 1787, Elizabeth b 1790 and Robert b 1796.

Robert Chambers
1796 -
son of William Chambers  
and Alice Williams
Anne Chambers
(nee Humphrey)
1819 -
parents of Humphrey William Chambers

Great great great grandparents
of David Hughe
s

Robert married Anne Humphrey in 1816, when he was 20 and she was 15.

1841 census Rhydbont, Rhoscolyn

Robert Chambers 45 was a farmer, wife Ann was 40.
William 20 was a joiner, Humphrey 20, Jane 15, Anne 14, Robert 11, Elizabeth 8, Margaret 4 and Elinor 2.
Margaret Williams, 50 was also resident.
All were born on Anglesey.

Their children were; William Robert Chambers, 1819-1885, Humphrey William, born 1821, Jane, b 1824, Ann b 1827, Elizabeth b 1829, Robert b 1829, Margaret b 1836 and Elinor b 1836.


Humphrey William Chambers
1822 -
son of  Robert Chambers
and Anne Humphrey
Margaret Chambers
(nee Owens)
1819 -
parents of Mary Chambers
Great great grandparents
of David Hughes


1841 census Rhydbont, Rhoscolyn

Robert Chambers 45 was a farmer, wife Ann was 40.
William 20 was a joiner, Humphrey 20, Jane 15, Anne 14, Robert 11, Elizabeth 8, Margaret 4 and Elinor 2.
Margaret Williams, 50 was also resident.
All were born on A
nglesey.


William Chambers and Margaret Owens were married in Beaumaris in 1846, by the Reverend Brown.

1851 census Kingsland, Holyhead

Humphrey Chambers, 29, born Llanfaelog, was a Railway Servant. His wife Margaret was 32, and born in Beaumaris. They had one daughter, Jane, 1 born in Holyhead.
Visiting them at the time of the census were Hugh Williams, 27 of Amlwch, William Williams, 55, both Railway Servants, and Owen Owens 29, a labourer, born in Beaumaris.
Margaret Fraser, 18 was a domestic servant.


1861 census, 3 Kingsland Hill, Holyhead.

William Chambers, 39, was now a labourer, his wife Margaret 32 ran a Grocer's Shop. Daughter Jane was 11, Mary 7 Ann 4 and Robert 3. All children were born in Holyhead
An Williams 22 was a servant, and lodging with them was William Chambers, 19 born Llanfaelog.


 

Humphrey William and Margaret Chambers
 

The Chambers Children
 

1871 census Tyn y Felin, Rhoscolyn

Humphrey Chambers 50 was now a farmer, Margaret was 53.
Daughter Jane was 21, Mary 18 and Robert 14.
Nephew William Chambers 20, born Hulme, Manchester was a mariner, and Hugh Roberts, 20 of Bryngwaran, a farm servant.


1881 census 13 Kingsland, Holyhead

Humphrey William 59 was a foreman - Railway Goods Porter, Margaret was 62, Robert 23 was Foreman Joiner.


Humphrey died around October1888.